Alexi Lawless Author Story

What genre of books do you normally write?
Romantic suspense, thriller

Tell us your author story:
For as long as I can recall, I’ve been writing. I had a Commodore 64 that I used to bang away on. I upgraded to a massive word processor in middle school that took up a ton of space in my room. It had what must have been the slowest dot matrix printer in the the world. My mother used to have to kick me out of the house to make me play with other kids. So I’d just sit on the porch and annoy the hell out of her telling her about all the stories I was writing.

I got really serious about wriing in high school and most of college– even chose the school I went to based on their phenomenal English program in mind, but alas, my capitalistic side took over mid-way, and I decided to go pre-Law and business so I could fund my expensive appetites and proclivity for shoes.

I realize now the writing professionally was always going to happen. Whether at 65 or now, it was never really a question. One my favorite quotes is from Maya Angelou (God rest her lovely, lovely soul):

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.”

Tell the reader about your latest book:
As her dangerous present and her enigmatic past collide, Samantha conducts the riskiest operation of her life, and the men who love her will be forced to decide if they trust her enough to let her protect them, and if they love her enough to let her go. Complicated Creatures Part Two is now available for pre-order on Amazon. ARC reviewers needed!

BUY ON AMAZON

“Another Author Marketing Club Premium member featured book. Ready to see your book featured here? Become a Premium member today”

Gina Amos Author Story

What genre of books do you normally write?
crime fiction, cosy crime, mystery

Tell us your author story:
Gina Amos is an Australian writer. She grew up in a wine growing area in the Hunter Valley of New South Wales, Australia and moved to Sydney when she was just 17. From an early age she had always loved reading mysteries but came to writing crime quite by accident. It was only when an elderly neighbour in her quiet, conservative Sydney suburban street died, that she began to question why the woman’s body had not been discovered for over a week. The old woman’s lonely death stayed with Gina.Fifteen years after the woman’s death, Gina began to have recurring dreams about the woman and was compelled to write her story. What began as a tale of isolation and pride amongst the elderly, soon turned to crime when Gina realised to write an interesting story, instead of dying from a heart attack, she would be murdered. This she did in her debut novel, “Secrets and Lies”

Gina’s greatest success has been the satisfaction of knowing readers enjoy reading her books. Her greatest thrill was when she received a text message from a woman on a Virgin flight who had just finished “Secrets and Lies” She told her she had just finished the book and had “enjoyed it immensely!”

Tell the reader about your latest book:
‘Killing Sunday,’ the second book in the Jill Brennan detective series and is set in Sydney, Australia. It’s summer and it’s hot. But it’s not the heat Senior Constable Jill Brennan is concerned about. She has just been assigned to an undercover case in Sydney’s art heartland. The task force has its eyes on an art diva with outrageous dress sense. The only problem is she has gone missing. What began as a straight forward case, turns into a major murder investigation with surprising consequences.

BUY ON AMAZON

“Another Author Marketing Club Premium member featured book. Ready to see your book featured here? Become a Premium member today”

Pamela Fagan Hutchins Author Story

What genre of books do you normally write?
Fiction: Mystery

Tell us your author story:
My names is Pamela Fagan Hutchins. I am an indie author who published my first romantic mystery, Saving Grace (Katie & Annalise Series, #1), in November of 2012. Since then I have published the next two books in the series, and in the meantime I have worked very hard to accumulate readers, reviews, ratings, rankings, and recommendations. I’ve enjoyed modest success. Saving Grace has cracked the top 50 on Nook and Kindle, and the 2nd two books in the series have also achieved genre bestseller status. But in June of 2014, I had a breakout month that has netted me about $40,000 in three months on my books, and I thought you guys would want to know how it happened.

Two things to know about me: a) I’m a huge proponent of Bookbub and Author Marketing Club and b) I’ve been lucky enough to have Bookbub feature my novels three times, the third being Friday June 27. I wrote about the first two times on the Indie Publishing Blog at http://skipjackpublishing.com. They were great. This third time literally is a game changer for me, and I want to tell you why, and, more importantly, how. But first, it’s important to understand who Bookbub is and what they do.

Bookbub runs a free subscription book recommendation service featuring quality free and discounted ebooks. The emails are sent to people based on their expressed genre and ereader preferences (Kindle, Nook, iBooks, Kobo, Google Play, and Smashwords). Their email list is ungodly huge, and people follow their advice, more than any other recommendation/promotion service of its type, in my opinion.

While their emails are free, Bookbub makes its money by charging to promote the books it features. And they charge a lot. For my category, mystery/thriller, it costs $700 to promote a discounted book for one day and $310 to promote a free book for the same time period.
And it ain’t easy to get picked. I’ve submitted my books approximately 20 times. Obviously, I got a lot of no’s. Bookbub recently shared how they select their featured books on their blog at http://unbound.bookbub.com. On any given day, their emails feature NYT bestselling authors at the same time as indies on-the-rise. They’re selective, but egalitarian.

It’s important to understand that it may take an author years to build the type of credentials that leads to selection. Years of writing great books, promoting their books through other less exclusive promotion services, selling solid numbers of books, and building up a sizeable review count, as well as awards and other recognition. I haven’t seen a discounted book promoted on Bookbub with less than 60 reviews in months; free books sometimes have less reviews, but, if they do, they make up for it with the credentials of the author and her previous books.

My first BookBub was a 99 cent discount run of Saving Grace, #1 in the Katie & Annalise series. Thanks to Bookbub, I made thousands of dollars, moved up to #134 on the author list on Amazon, and Saving Grace reached #7 overall on Nook and #34 on Kindle. It was amazing. And somewhat temporary. The sales fell pretty fast after a couple of weeks. Yet I think it would be fair to say it was a permanent small boost.

For my second Bookub, I discounted Leaving Annalise, #2 in the Katie & Annalise series, to 99 cents. Unfortunately, Bookbub and I crossed signals. I favor wide distribution for my books rather than Kindle exclusives. I had submitted the book that way, but when it came time for me to check that they were running it as such, I failed to do so, and they ran it only for Kindle. The promotion was thus far less successful than my first one. Still, I more than made my money back, and Leaving Annalise became a Kindle bestseller.

At the same time as my second Bookbub, I released Finding Harmony, #3 in the Katie & Annalise series. Around that time, I took notice of the tremendous success that some authors were having by making the first book in their series free, permanently. This strategy is called perma-free. It terrified me. Take the book that sold best for me and give it away, forever? Yet it made sense, too. SkipJack Publishing doesn’t have the money to promote my books like I’m janet Evanovich. I have to become visible to readers some other way. If I can hook them on my novels with a first-in-series-free ebook, might they buy the others? And I now had two more in the series to sell, priced attractively at $2.99 and $3.99, plus I had a new novel for pre-order (unfortunately, during the first two months of this surge, Kindle did not allow indie pre-orders, so I missed a lot of potential sales then, but I have it set up for Kindle pre-order now), Going for Kona, at $4.99. I could hope for genera tion of reviews, too.

I decided to go for it. Only one problem. Amazon doesn’t allow you to set a price of zero, permanently, for an ebook. It does allow those in KDP Select to have up to five free days a month, but I wasn’t going back to KDP Select, and I didn’t want five days. I wanted forever. However, Kobo not only allows free books, it runs its own “first in series free” promotions, and doesn’t charge a cent for them. (Thanks Kobo!!) Smashwords allows free books, and iBooks and Nook allow them through Smashwords aggregation. I set Saving Grace up free in all those spots, then I let people know that they could have it free anywhere but Kindle, and if they wanted it free on Kindle, they needed to “Report a Lower Price Elsewhere,” and then we’d cross our fingers that Amazon would price math.

They did, after only 24 hours. (Yet I’ve had a short story free for four months, and they have still not price-match on it.)
I immediately applied for a free day promotion on Bookbub for Saving Grace, and got in. Meanwhile, I ran promotions with some of my favorite “smaller” promo sites, like Bargain ebook Hunter, Pixel of Ink, eReader News Today, and a slew of other free promotions that I found through my beloved Author Marketing Club.

Free downloads started immediately on all of the sites. By my free Bookbub day, I had 25,000 in downloads across my sales sites. My paid sales, however, had dropped precipitously in the few months prior. They had starting creeping back up after the perma-free strategy was implemented, but not much, yet. Thus, Leaving Annalise had a Kindle ranking of about 15,000 and Finding Harmony 25,000. I was selling about 200 ebooks a week across all sites, between those two books and my six nonfiction books, for total revenue of about $400 a week for ebooks. I also sell print and audiobooks, at that time about 30 per week.

My husband and I got in the Bookmobile—our book touring RV—and left on the 27th for our Redneck Writer Road Trip tour, right when the Bookbub emails went out.

Let me make a long and incredible story short. Saving Grace went to #2 in free books on Kindle and stayed in the top 20 for a week. Across all sites, we had 110,000 downloads during that time. Awesome, right?

It gets much, much better.

Sales picked up by the end of the 27th for Leaving Annalise. By the end of the first week, its rank was up to 846 on Kindle. Finding Harmony rose to 1562. My author rank soared to 1120. I’ll take those numbers any day of the week. But what it meant in terms of sales and reviews is the real story.
In the first week after Bookbub, I sold 2492 ebooks and generated royalties of over $4500 dollars, on a $310 promotion. Well, a $310 promotion, years of writing, and 2.5 years of promotion and base building :-), things you can learn about, if you want, in my book What Kind of Loser Indie Publishes, and How Can I Be One, Too?. And those sales are on books I didn’t promote! Sales ran as follows For every 1 book I sold on Google Play, I sold 2 on Kobo, 13 on iBooks, over 25 on Nook, and over 70 on Kindle (and 0 on Smashwords). By the end of the summer, I’d made $40,000 and added 500 reviews to my books. And 200,000 people had downloaded Saving Grace. That’s what I want–I want people to have no reason not to download my free series lead and get to know my work. I’m counting on a solid fraction of those downloads to continue to result in purchase of my other novels.

And the free downloads continue, too. While I wait for the 200,000 that have already downloaded Saving Grace since June 1 to get around to reading it and deciding whether to keep going with me, more people download it. Sweet! Of course, I continue to promote Saving Grace as a perma-free book each week, and I try to book the most successful promotions every two to three weeks, to keep my rankings up. It’s much easier to preserve rankings than create them.

One big surprise: the sale generated a large number of audiobook purchases, mainly because Amazon allows a $1.99 add-on of audio to an ebook download, even if the ebook is free. So 175 people have downloaded audio this week too. The only category of sales not yet impacted is print books, but I didn’t expect it to be.

The great unknown? How many buyers in the last week ordered my upcoming novel Going for Kona. I guess I’ll know October 1st, and of course I’ll share it on SkipJack’s blog.

My takeaway from this experience is that the perma-free strategy is a sound one for multi-title novelists trying to generate visibility, reviews, and sales of their other books, and that a BookBub promo of that perma-free book can be a game changer.

Like it was for me.

The long-term impact of the promotion for my books is not yet tested. However, I’m pretty hopeful for a longer range impact given the number of copies of Saving Grace sitting on people’s ereaders, ready for them when they have the time to open it. And if sales start to falter, I can guarantee you it is free downloads of Saving Grace that I will promote, as those efforts are exponentially effective–not my other books. In fact, I can’t wait to release my next series, and hope that this strategy remains viable, because my big regret is that I didn’t have more novels to sell the people that wanted to keep going.

If I can do it, you can do it. It all comes down to the 5 R’s: readers, rankings, reviews, ratings, and recommendations. If you generate those, and you have multiple complementary titles (preferably a genre series), then the perma-free/Bookbub strategy is viable for you, too.

Tell the reader about your latest book:
Going for Kona is my 4th romantic mystery, and it’s a spin-off of my Katie & Annalise series. In Going for Kona, Michele Lopez Hanson wants to burrow into bed for the rest of her life when her husband is killed by a hit-and-run driver, but she must carry on, to compete in the Kona Ironman Triathlon in his honor, and to keep their kids and herself from meeting his same fate.

BUY ON AMAZON

“Another Author Marketing Club Premium member featured book. Ready to see your book featured here? Become a Premium member today”

Lew Sauder

What genre of books do you normally write?
Business Parable (business fiction)

Tell us your author story:
I’ve been a consultant and a project manager for most of my career. I began seeing young consultants who had trouble understanding how to deal with clients and manage their careers. As a result, I wrote “Consulting 101” in 2010. I collaborated with Jeff Porter in 2013 to write the business parable “The Reluctant Mentor”, about baby boomers and millennials mentoring each other. This year, I combined the 101 theme with the business parable to write Project Management 101, a business novel about a young woman who manages a large project and learns 101 tips for project management.

Tell the reader about your latest book:
Project Management 101 is an entertaining business novel to help project managers develop management expertise. The main character, Holly Hewitt, faces the biggest challenge of her career. She has been assigned to manage the merger of two large food products companies. As she faces setbacks and challenges, she learns a few things about project management, and even mentors others on some of her own management and leadership knowledge.

BUY ON AMAZON

“Another Author Marketing Club Premium member featured book. Ready to see your book featured here? Become a Premium member today”

Morgan St. James Author Story

What genre of books do you normally write?
funny mysteries, romantic suspense, true crime

Tell us your author story:
I am a former interior designer, marketing representative and a myriad of other interesting endeavors. While I was the co-owner of a design studio as prestigious interior design magazine approached me and my partner about writing an article for their publication. We did, and it was a hit. Thus began my first foray into writing and I subsequently became an award-winning author with eleven published books to my credit. While I love writing funny mysteries and stories involving revenge, included in my body of work is La Bella Mafia, a true story of surviving despite overwhelming odds, co-authored with true crime writer Dennis Griffin and Bella Capo (whose story it is). Dennis and I are in the final stages of finishing Izzy and Me, a true story told by the daughter of Izzy Marion, about of the world of celebrities Izzy mingled with as Hair Stylist to the Stars, h is Mob affiliations and hidden penchant for abuse behind closed doors, In addition to other books I’ve has written on my own, the funny crime capers include the comical Silver Sisters Mysteries series co-authored with my real-life sister, Phyllice Bradner. More information about me and all of my books, websites and blogs can be found on www.morganstjames-author.com I’ve also written over 600 published articles related to writing and frequently present workshops, appear on author’s panels and radio or TV shows. Columns I wrote for examiner.com inspired my book Writers Tricks of the Trade as well as the bi-monthly eZine of the same name. I live in Las Vegas NV with my husband and Dylan the Dog who rules the roost.

Tell the reader about your latest book:
Kimberly lived the good life with a great executive job, wardrobe to die for, and hot young boyfriend. That all changed when her company went bankrupt and her boy-toy took off with her money and most of her worldly possessions. When she accepts a job with the Federal prison system, she and her sidekicks are faced with not only a “whodunit” but a “howdunit.” They have some hard choices to make. Federal prison manufacturing is nearly a billion dollar a year business & someone is taking a share

BUY ON AMAZON

“Another Author Marketing Club Premium member featured book. Ready to see your book featured here? Become a Premium member today”